Crab Chowder?

In 2012, northeast sea surface temperatures reached an all-time high. Many speculate that rising water temperatures have contributed to a record high catch of 126 million pounds of American lobster, Homerus americanus, in the Gulf of Maine. However, the steady rise in New England’s sea surface temperatures may have also made southern areas of New England inhospitable for lobster. In a recent interview with AccuWeater, Maine Lobstermen Association’s Patrice McCarron said, “In southern New England, Buzzard Bay, Mass., and the waters off of Rhode Island, temperatures in the Long Island Sound area have become too warm for lobsters.” Lobster catch in these areas has plummeted since the 1990s.

The warming trend in New England waters has caused alarm for local fishermen, and we’re only beginning to understand the ways climate change might affect our fisheries. While some treasured New England species may relocate father north, it’s possible that other species will move into this region and create new economic opportunities.

We’ve written before about some of these species moving north as water temperatures rise, and now we can add another to the roster—blue crabs. Although blue crabs are traditionally caught off Maryland and Virginia, fishermen in Long Island Sound have been seeing more of them lately. Some think that, in time, Long Island Sound could replicate the blue crab fishery of southern areas like Chesapeake Bay.

The blue crab, Callinectes sapidus, whose Latin name can be translated to mean “beautiful savory swimmer,” is the Maryland state crustacean and the most valuable shellfish in the mid-Atlantic region. The crabs can grow to be around 4 in long and 9 in wide, weighing around 1 pound, and reaching maturity in 12 to 18 months. The bottom-dwelling blue crab can live in a range of salinities, feeding off of crabs, claims, snails, eelgrass, sea lettuce and decayed vegetation. Blue crabs can be found all along the Atlantic Coast, with a prominent population in Chesapeake Bay presently suffering from habitat degradation and overfishing.

Could Maryland’s pride species create a new industry in New England Waters? The blue crab, caught for sale in both hard and soft shell forms, is currently sold at a market price in Maryland of $39.25 per dozen. With the growing blue crab population and a high demand market, does New England clam chowder have a new competitor on the way?

Scientists are careful to note that the long-term effects of climate change on species like blue crabs are still far too uncertain to predict the future of a fishery, but one thing is for sure—New England’s ocean is changing, and marine life is on the move.

Image credit: Benjamin Wilson, Flickr