Happy National Seafood Month!

October is National Seafood Month—a great time to think about the sustainability of our seafood and how our personal choices can help keep our oceans healthy! According to NOAA Fisheries, the average American eats 14 to 16 pounds of seafood a year; with a U.S. population of 319 million people (U.S. Census), that’s 4,466 to 5,104 million pounds per year!

How can our oceans possibly sustain such a booming seafood market? NOAA Fisheries provides one simple answer: habitat protection. Over the summer, NOAA Fisheries released a video titled, “Healthy Habitat: The Foundation of America’s Seafood and Fisheries,” to address the importance of ocean habitat protection, not only for marine organisms, but for us as well!

When it comes to sustainable fisheries New England, unfortunately, has a pretty poor track record. The region is known for historic overfishing, disappointing fisheries management, and sadly, the recent collapse of the Gulf of Maine cod fishery—the iconic fish of our region.

New England fisheries are far from perfect—very, very far. But, in the spirit of National Seafood Month you can educate yourself about sustainably-sourced fish and make smarter, more informed consumer choices. The New England Aquarium has its own list of “ocean friendly seafood species,” as well as delicious recipes that you can try.

Also, it is important now more than ever to take NOAA’s message to heart and protect precious marine habitat. Cashes Ledge—located in the center of our own Gulf of Maine— is one such habitat that we can help protect.

Cashes Ledge is an underwater mountain range whose unique environmental conditions produce a biodiversity hotspot for marine life. On Cashes Ledge, nutrient- and oxygen-rich water at the ledge’s peak give rise to the largest kelp forest on the Atlantic seaboard and a rich diversity of species ranging from bottom-dwelling sea stars, sea anemones, and purple sponges to highly endangered North Atlantic right whales.

Closed to destructive fishing practices for over a decade, Cashes Ledge and surrounding areas are in danger of being reopened to commercial bottom-trawling—a proposal that would ultimately destroy the habitat and further decimate the remaining cod population. National Seafood Month is a great opportunity to remind ourselves of the importance of sustainable fishing practices and its associated benefits associated. Conservation Law Foundation (CLF) is asking NOAA Fisheries to permanently protect Cashes Ledge and maintain it as an ecologically important area and healthy habitat for marine life.

You can help CLF to protect New England ocean habitat by signing our protection for Cashes Ledge petition here.

“Snap the Shore, See the Future”

Living in the Gulf of Maine area, climate change and sea level rise are bound to affect our lives. According to the EPA, we could see a 2-foot rise in global sea level by 2100. For almost 50 years Conservation Law Foundation (CLF) has worked to restore and protect the Gulf of Maine and surrounding waters, New England’s largest public trust resource. Our work includes cleaning up our harbors, protecting ocean wildlife and critical ocean habitats like Cashes Ledge, and working to create a region-wide plan to help coastal communities adapt to rising sea levels caused by climate change.

It can be difficult to imagine the effect climate change will have on our coastlines. That’s why CLF appreciates the work of the King Tides Project, a non-profit organization made up of local interest groups that strives to effectively explain to people just how climate change will impact our coasts and the people living there.

King tides are completely natural phenomena, occurring twice a year when the sun and moon align. And even though they are regular and predictable, king tides have a chance of damaging coastlines if they occur during poor weather conditions. These tides “give us a sneak preview of what higher sea levels could look like.”

The next king tide is tomorrow, October 9th at 12:30pm—this is where you come in. The King Tides Project is hosting a Gulf of Maine King Tides Photo Contest! The organization wants local residents to visually document how the king tide—what may very well be “the new tidal norm” with sea level rise—is affecting Gulf of Maine coastal areas. So, CLF members and supporters, here is your chance to show us how you view the Gulf of Maine and why we should take action to reduce the effects of climate change! For more information, you can go to the Gulf of Maine King Tides website.

International Surfing Day – A holiday my husband can get behind

It’s no secret that my husband is not a huge fan of holidays. The pomp and circumstance confuse and overwhelm him. This is not the case for International Surfing Day—a day that he wholeheartedly embraces and celebrates to the fullest extent every year—a day when it is him, not our children, who rises jittery with the promise of holiday-making swells in the North Atlantic.

International Surfing Day is a global celebration of our oceans and beaches organized by the Surfrider Foundation. Friday, June 20th marks the 10th Annual International Surfing Day, and beachgoers and surfers will host more than 140 events ranging from beach cleanups to surf contests in over 30 countries.

Granted living in New Hampshire does not always mean rideable waves or the warmest of waters, but a day in recognition of the dynamic sport that allows you to interact with the ocean in unique and inspiring ways is enough to celebrate regardless of the conditions. That is why tomorrow afternoon will be particularly sad for my husband—not because our family will be heading to Jenness Beach in Rye, NH to join other local families participating in Surfrider’s beach cleanup and play in the waves, but because he had rotator cuff surgery a month ago and is under strict instructions not to paddle out under any circumstances.

CLF's Jen Felt
CLF’s Jen Felt

We will pack a surfboard anyway, because while he is running around on the beach after our children with his one good arm, I will be out on the water attempting to carve inspiration. Do you want to know why? I love celebrating International Surfing Day too. That’s why I do the work I do as part of CLF’s oceans team—protecting the oceans is vital to ensuring that we can enjoy celebrations like International Surfing Day now and far into the future.

Celebrating New England’s Oceans on World Oceans Day

This Sunday is World Oceans Day, an international event to celebrate and honor the ocean. This year, volunteers have organized events in locations around the world, from Massachusetts to Mozambique. The message of the day is simple—our oceans are valuable but at risk, and there are easy steps all of us can take to help.

World Oceans Day is a global event, but we thought we’d bring it back home to New England by celebrating the incredible marine habitat in the Gulf of Maine. For the past two weeks, Conservation Law Foundation’s dive team has been exploring some of the amazing places in the Gulf of Maine, from the inshore Isles of Shoals to the incredible Cashes Ledge, 100 miles off the Maine coast.

Cashes Ledge is an underwater mountain range whose steep ridges mix nutrient- and oxygen-rich water, creating a very productive environment. The ledge harbors the largest and deepest kelp forest off the east coast; our divers tell us the kelp on Cashes is so lush and dense it can be tricky to even see the seafloor and navigate along the bottom. To give you an idea of what diving in the kelp looks like, here’s a video from one of the team’s previous trips to Cashes Ledge, taken by videographer Lu Lamar.

The area around Cashes Ledge has been protected for over a decade, but unfortunately, this incredible habitat is now at risk of being opened to commercial trawling. The current proposal under consideration by NOAA and the New England Fishery Management Council would eliminate protection for three quarters of the area around Cashes Ledge. World Oceans Day is a perfect reminder that healthy oceans need healthy habitat, and the incredible ecosystem on Cashes Ledge is worth protecting for good.

You can join in the World Oceans Day festivities by finding an event on the website—there are lots of events in towns across New England, from 5Ks to surfing meet-ups. You can also take a “selfie for the sea”—a photo of yourself doing something for the ocean or making a promise to protect it—and post it with the hashtag #WorldOceansDay. And if you’d like to help protect marine habitat right here in New England,you can help ask NOAA to maintain full protection for the area surrounding Cashes Ledge by signing our petition here.

Dive In with Brian Skerry as He Prepares to Photograph Cashes Ledge

Over the past two years, National Geographic photographer Brian Skerry has taken us on an incredible tour of some of our region’s marine life—from blue sharks to red cod to North Atlantic right whales.

We now have some exciting news to share with you all—over the next two weeks, Brian Skerry will return to the Gulf of Maine and Cashes Ledge to photograph more of New England’s incredible marine life and habitat!

Brian has photographed marine life around the world—from China to Spain and everywhere in between—so we’re excited to have him return to his native New England waters (he’s originally from Uxbridge, MA). Brian has called New England Ocean Odyssey “an opportunity to bring my fellow New Englanders along with me and show them that our ocean is every bit as thrilling and surprising and beautiful as seemingly more exotic locales.”

From May 25 to June 6, Brian will dive from the R/V Tioga out of Portsmouth, NH. The ultimate goal: to return to Cashes Ledge, an ecological marvel 100 miles off the Maine coast. This underwater mountain range rises to within 40 feet of the surface. Being so close to the surface exposes this mountaintop to sunlight, and its steep topography creates internal waves that mix nutrient- and oxygen-rich water. This mixing supports incredible productivity, including the deepest and largest cold water kelp forest along the Atlantic seaboard. The diverse habitat of Cashes Ledge draws in an incredible array of marine wildlife—rare anemones and sponges, fish like cod, wolffish, and bluefin tuna, blue and porbeagle sharks, and endangered North Atlantic right whales and humpback whales.

The exact dive locations will depend on a lot of factors, like weather and visibility, but Brian and the team are hoping to visit sites from the inshore Isles of Shoals to more far-flung locations, including Cashes Ledge. Along the way, Brian will be joined by a team of ocean scientists, advocates, photographers, and videographers, including Dr. Jon Witman, a marine ecologist who led the first ecological study of overfishing in the Gulf of Maine and has spent decades studying invertebrate and fish communities on Cashes Ledge and other marine habitats in the region. We’ll be introducing more members of our dive team to you over the next two weeks.

Brian and the entire team are looking forward to exploring some of the incredible habitat the Gulf of Maine has to offer, from rocky shoals to anemone beds to lush kelp forests. Over the next two weeks, be sure to follow Conservation Law Foundation and New England Ocean Odyssey on Facebook and on Twitter at #CLFDive2014 as we share snapshots and updates from this one-of-a-kind expedition. With Brian as our guide, we look forward to revealing more of the amazing wonders beneath New England’s waves.

Brian Skerry Joins Us at the Boston Sea Rovers’ Dive Show and You Should Too!

We are so excited to be at the Boston Sea Rovers’ dive show again this year as an exhibitor, and are thrilled to announce that we will be hosting a panel discussion on Saturday, March 8th with world-renowned underwater photographer and Sea Rover Brian Skerry, eminent marine scientist and Professor of Biology at Boston University Les Kaufman, and Conservation Law Foundation’s VP and Ocean Program Director Priscilla Brooks!

Details:

  • The Boston Sea Rovers’ show is March 7th – 9th at the DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel in Danvers, MA. All the information you need to register and attend is on the Sea Rovers’ website.
  • Our presentation and panel discussion will be on Saturday, March 8th at 2 pm. The location within the hotel will be announced at the day of the presentation.

 

Brian Skerry will be showing his awe-inspiring photographs of Cashes Ledge – a New England undersea treasure in need of protection. Skerry and CLF are working to document and protect this special place. Come hear why Skerry says diving on Cashes Ledge is every bit as thrilling, surprising, and beautiful as anywhere else he’s been. He will give a short talk, featuring his original photography, about what he’s seen in the kelp forest on Cashes Ledge and why he is motivated to help keep it thriving. After the talk, there will be a panel discussion with Skerry, Witman, and Brooks.

We will also have a booth in the exhibit hall where you can come by and chat, learn more about Cashes Ledge, and help us with our work to protect this special place. We hope to see you there!

Originally published on February 6th.

World Premiere of Ocean Frontiers II – A New England Story for Sustaining the Sea

How do we meet our ever-expanding demands on the ocean and also work together to protect it? The answer is explored in a new film from Green Fire Productions, Ocean Frontiers II: A New England Story for Sustaining the Sea. The second in the award-winning film series, Ocean Frontiers II is an inspiring story of citizens working together for the sake of the sea. Please join us for the premieres of this timely and important film in Providence on October 28th and in Boston on October 29th.

Ocean Frontiers II brings you face to face with those now embarking on the nation’s first regional ocean plan, promoting healthier economies and healthier seas across New England. A spotlight on Rhode Island reveals how the Ocean State turned potential conflict into collaboration, inviting all on a path of ocean stewardship. Watch the film trailer here http://ocean-frontiers.org/trailer.

The world premiere of Ocean Frontiers II is in Rhode Island on October 28th, at 7pm at the Providence Public Library. The Massachusetts premiere is the following night, October 29th, at the New England Aquarium’s IMAX theater in Boston, also at 7pm. Both events are free and open to the public, but space is limited so please make your reservation:

 

Providence, October 28th http://bit.ly/OceanFrontiers2RI

Boston, October 29th http://bit.ly/OceanFrontiers2Boston

 

Following the screening of each film we will have a short panel discussion that explores New England’s leadership to foster sustainable growth of our ocean economy and the protection and restoration of our ocean ecosystems.

You may have seen the original Ocean Frontiers: The Dawn of a New Era in Ocean Stewardship, at one of our previous screeningsOcean Frontiers is a compelling voyage to seaports and watersheds across the country to meet industrial shippers and whale biologists, pig farmers and wetland ecologists, commercial and sport fishermen and reef snorkelers—all of them embarking on a new course of cooperation to sustain the sea and our coastal and ocean economies.

Following on the heels of the award-winning Ocean Frontiers I, Green Fire Productions brings you face to face with those now embarking on the nation’s first multi-state attempt at ocean planning. Navy scientists, wind-energy executives, fishermen, Native American tribal leaders, planners and environmental advocates – all are working as one to promote healthier economies and a healthier ocean across the breadth of New England.

According to Karen Meyer, Executive Director of Green Fire Productions, “One of our goals was to make sure that people know that ocean planning is underway and that all of our voices are really critical at this stage. It’s our role as concerned citizens who are interested in coastal economies and a thriving marine ecosystem to be involved and make our voices heard.”

Please join us at one of these premieres and learn how to make your voice heard in ocean planning. In the meantime, learn more about why ocean planning matters in New England. We hope to see you at the movies!

Mark Your Calendars: Ocean Awareness Week is Coming to NH’s Seacoast!

Here at Conservation Law Foundation, we would like every week to be Ocean Awareness Week. So, when our friends at the Seacoast Science Center in Rye, New Hampshire and The Music Hall in Portsmouth told us that they were planning a week of local activities and events dedicated to everything ocean this October, we were all over it. CLF is very proud to sponsor the first annual Ocean Awareness Week, alongside The Music Hall, the Seacoast Science Center, Gundalow Company and Kent Stephens’ Stage Force.

Ocean Awareness Week aims to bring attention to the importance of healthy oceans with a particular focus on the Gulf of Maine and the role of arts and culture in promoting sustainability. CLF has long been a leader in protecting the Gulf of Maine and its coastal treasures like the Great Bay estuary. CLF’s New England Ocean Odyssey campaign, which aims to engage New Englanders in caring for their oceans and coasts through photography, is a perfect fit with Ocean Awareness Week’s focus on art to promote ocean and coastal awareness.

Ocean Awareness Week kicks off at the Seacoast Science Center on Sunday, October 6 with two screenings of the film, Ocean Frontiers at 11 AM and 2PM. Produced by Karen Meyers, Ocean Frontiers shows how the many users of the ocean, from fishermen to shippers to farmers, are solving challenging problems affecting our busy oceans by working together. The film tells fascinating stories of the innovative solutions that these stakeholders have created out of shared concern for the future of one of our most precious of natural resources. Following each screening, Seacoast Science Center President, Wendy Lull, and CLF’s Director of Ocean Conservation, Dr. Priscilla Brooks, will host a question and answer session for attendees.

Meanwhile, Seacoast Science Center visitors can get a close up look at the amazing wildlife that lives in New England’s ocean through the lens of renowned underwater photographer, Brian Skerry. Skerry, a New England native whose arresting photographs have graced the pages (and many covers!) of National Geographic magazine, has partnered with CLF to bring attention to the mysteries of New England’s ocean through the New England Ocean Odyssey. For the first time at the Center, Skerry’s exclusive photographs for CLF will be displayed together, revealing surprising facets of ocean life that cement our bond with these remote creatures and reinforce our will to protect their home.

Skerry’s photos will be displayed alongside the work of several other local photographers who love diving in New England’s ocean and sharing what they see in her murky depths. The works chosen for the exhibit are winners of New England Ocean Odyssey’s monthly photo contest, which Skerry helps to judge. The New England Ocean Odyssey photo exhibit will run through December. Visitors to the Center can pick up free postcards of Skerry’s photographs and other CLF literature.

Later in the week, CLF will take more of Skerry’s photos on the road to several Ocean Awareness Week events. Our traveling team of New England ocean and coastal experts will be on hand to talk about CLF’s work and answer questions at the following events and locations:

  • Wednesday, October 9 from 4:30-6:30 PM, Gundalow Company VIP Boat Cruise

The Dock at Prescott Park, at the end of Water Street, Portsmouth

CLF’s new Great-Bay Piscataqua Waterkeeper, Jeff Barnum, will be a featured speaker on this educational outing aboard the Piscataqua about the Gulf of Maine and our marine ecosystem. The cruise is free for VIP Reception Ticket holders. Space is limited. For reservations call Gundalow Company at 603-433-9505.

  • Saturday, October 12 at The Music Hall Historic Theater

4PM: Nationally recognized storyteller Jay O’Callahan performs the story of Richard Wheeler’s epic kayak journey tracing the path of the now extinct sea bird, The Great Auk.

5PM: Portsmouth Ocean Prize ceremony honoring Richard Wheeler

6:15 PM: VIP reception at The Loft at the Music Hall

Open to VIP seating and reception ticket holders.

Tickets to all Music Hall events may be purchased online at The Music Hall website. Prices vary. View the full itinerary of events and pricing.

Our Ocean Awareness Week team includes, in addition to Dr. Brooks:

Tom Irwin, Director of CLF New Hampshire, Robin Just, Ocean Communications Associate, Leah Fine, Ocean Program Assistant, Jeff Barnum, CLF’s Great Bay-Piscataqua Waterkeeper.

We hope you’ll come visit with us as you enjoy Ocean Awareness Week!