New England’s Dive Community Supports Protecting Cashes Ledge!

Last weekend, we joined the Boston Sea Rovers at their annual show in Danvers, MA, to talk with divers and other ocean enthusiasts about Cashes Ledge, a Gulf of Maine ecological treasure. We always have a great time at Sea Rovers, and this year was no exception. Countless divers stopped by our booth to learn more about Cashes Ledge, which is now at immediate risk of being opened to destructive bottom trawling, and hundreds of people signed on to our petition asking NOAA to protect the full area around the ledge. We also hosted a presentation with National Geographic photographer Brian Skerry, Boston University scientist Les Kaufman, and CLF Director of Ocean Conservation Priscilla Brooks.

Their discussion of the incredible value of this unique habitat—and what can be done to ensure its permanent protection—drew over 200 people to a packed room, including the legendary ocean advocate Sylvia Earle. Earle expressed disbelief that anyone would consider opening such incredible habitat to trawling, and she even offered to make Cashes Ledge a Hope Spot in her Mission Blue campaign. The enthusiasm from the Sea Rovers crowd blew us away, and we’re thrilled to have the support of the active and conservation-minded dive community as we seek to protect one of the most incredible marine habitats in New England.

That support is needed now more than ever. In recognition of the remarkable value of the habitat on and around Cashes Ledge, the New England Fishery Management Council closed this area to damaging bottom trawling and scallop dredging nearly 15 years ago. This protected status allowed previously trawled habitat areas to recover and has supported the health of juvenile and spawning fish. It has also allowed Cashes Ledge to serve as an underwater laboratory for numerous marine scientists, providing an opportunity to study ecosystem functioning and biodiversity in a rare environment that is isolated from the polluted waters of coastal habitats and less impacted by commercial fishing.

But now, near the end of an eight-year process to develop a comprehensive habitat plan for New England’s fisheries, the New England Fishery Management Council voted to eliminate protection for nearly three quarters of the Cashes Ledge protected area (the cross-hatched areas in the map below).

The NEFMC's current proposal would eliminate protection for nearly three quarters of the current protected area around Cashes Ledge.

Cashes Ledge has been protected from bottom trawling for almost 15 years, but is now at immediate risk of being opened to destructive bottom trawling. Cashes Ledge deserves protection. Please sign our petition asking NOAA to maintain protection for the entire Cashes Ledge area.